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  • Robin Black says:

    Excellent post and excellent advice, Dan. I think it’s SO easy to fall into the cliche of doing the same old landscape styles with the same old comp, so much so that beautiful spots begin to look generic. The moment your photography becomes formulaic, you are no longer an artist (and likely not a very good photographer).

  • bob dale says:

    Dan, thanks for reminder. I`ve always been impressed with artists who can put very little detail of the subject matter, yet the viewer has no trouble identifying the subject. One of the ones that comes to mind is a landscape with cattle on it in Nevada. When I first looked at a distance I immediately knew they were cows. But upon going closer, they were just little blobs so to speak with very little detail. I guess my mind filled in the details and I was satisfied.
    Thanks, Bob

  • This is some outstanding advice here, Dan! I especially liked ” Artists don’t set out to create real life, they strive to create visual representations of real life, while imparting a specific and unique flavor to their work.” – well said!

  • So very true Dan. There are a lot of images out there in the landscape photography world that look extremely similar. Far too often photographers set out to emulate the work of someone else instead of taking the time to discover the world through their own eyes. There are images waiting to be found everywhere, it just takes time to find them.

  • Rick says:

    Dan, this post should be required reading for anybody purchasing a camera. Me included.

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