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  • Steve Cole says:

    Eagerly awaiting your review of the 732 since I’m considering it to back up my 055 for trips longer than dayhikes.

  • Henry Lee says:

    Dan, thanks for your article – it serves as a nice reminder!

  • Lynne Odiase says:

    Do you mind if I quote a few of your posts as long as I provide credit and sources back to your site? My blog is in the very same area of interest as yours and my users would genuinely benefit from a lot of the information you present here. Please let me know if this alright with you. Regards!

  • […] Everyone knows that a tripod holds your camera steady and allows you to shoot at lower shutter speeds and smaller apertures without incurring camera shake. However, the simple act of setting up and using a tripod forces you to slow down and contemplate your subject matter more thoroughly and methodically. It forces you to more carefully consider how to compose and capture your subject in the best way. Get a tripod. Use it. Even if it’s a small one. Remember, the best tripod is the one that’s with you. […]

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    Terry Bourk

    I have read you new book “Behind the Landscape.” I could not “put it down” meaning that I kept at it because each photo you presented/analyzed was interesting and informative. I am trying to develop an eye for composition (both the scene and the light).

    Thank you! The examples you present and the suggestions are very helpful. Purple Mountains, McKinley River and Wonder Lake are fascinating.


    Roger Sinclair

    You have done it again! Another triumph.

    Your generosity to share, the clarity of thought and concise explanation thereof is brilliant. Perhaps I should also mention the beautiful photos and the talent necessary to produce them.

    Thank you, Dan.