March 16

0 comments

New Photoflex Lighting School Lesson – Snowshoe Running

By Dan

March 16, 2012

My latest lesson is up on the Photoflex LightingSchool website. It’s called Lighting an Alaskan Ultra Runner Outdoors, and showcases the TritonFlash, the FlashFire Wireless trigger kit and runner Beat Jegerlehner, who remarked that this photo shoot was more strenuous than running 350 miles across the Alaska wilderness in the middle of winter.

The lesson demonstrates the effects that a single flash can make on your outdoor action imagery. Keep in mind, that even though I use the TritonFlash battery powered strobe in the lesson shots, the same effect can be had with just a single off camera flash unit.

Stay tuned for more lessons throughout the year!

 

About the author

Hi, I'm Dan Bailey, a 20+ year pro outdoor and adventure photographer, and official FUJIFILM X-Photographer based in Anchorage, Alaska.


As a top rated blogger and author my goal is to help you become a better, more confident and competent photographer, so that you can have as much fun and creative enjoyment as I do.


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Terry Bourk

I have read you new book “Behind the Landscape.” I could not “put it down” meaning that I kept at it because each photo you presented/analyzed was interesting and informative. I am trying to develop an eye for composition (both the scene and the light).

Thank you! The examples you present and the suggestions are very helpful. Purple Mountains, McKinley River and Wonder Lake are fascinating.


Roger Sinclair

You have done it again! Another triumph.

Your generosity to share, the clarity of thought and concise explanation thereof is brilliant. Perhaps I should also mention the beautiful photos and the talent necessary to produce them.

Thank you, Dan.