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  • Boy you’ve about covered my whole kit with these last few posts!
    I use the 28mm 2.8 Nikkor on a crop-sensor body as my walk-around lens. Even at full-price it’s a bargin. I’ve noticed a bit of chromatic abboration when using it in the studio (strobes/white background), but for outdoor/travel it’s great.

    I’d recommend taking a look at one more lens; Tokina also makes a 2.8 11-16mm zoom for a reasonable price. Amazing for shooting dim interiors hand-held.

    Now if they could only find a way to make a *tiny* 80-200 2.8…

  • Dan Bailey says:

    Anthony, thanks for the comment. I had a hard time limiting the scope of this list. Keeping it under $600 gave me lots of good, but not too many options. The Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X Pro is indeed a great lens. I’m a big fan of Tokina lenses, I’ve used them in the past and they hold up quite well. I’d recommend that lens for photographers who need a good DX zoom lens.

  • Vern Rogers says:

    Hi Dan,

    Enjoy your articles, etc. For an extreme wide angle with my D3, I enjoy the Sigma 12-24, which gives me excellent results, some of which one can see in my photo galleries. You will find a link to my photos in my website, http://www.fotabug.com. Have you tried this lens? It is one of Sigma’s EX line, and my sample of the lens is high quality.

    Best wishes,

    Vern Rogers

  • Dan Bailey says:

    I have not used any Sigma lenses, although I hear good things about them from many photographers. Like I told Anthony, it was a real struggle not to include lenses like the 12-24mm options that are out there. I had to draw the line somewhere for calling it “budget.” I guess my next post in this category should be “The Best Mid Range Wide Angle Lenses.” Thanks for reading and for your comment. I’ll check out your site.

  • Russ Bishop says:

    Couldn’t live without my Nikkor 17-35, but it definitely doesn’t fall into the “budget” category. My close 2nd (and 1st for adventure and on the trail) is my 16mm 2.8. Although technivally a fisheye lens, with the DX body it becomes more like a 24mm. And it’s such a tiny package there’s no excuse for taking it everywhere.

  • I use the Sigma 10-20 on a Canon 7D (crop sensor) and get very good results with it. Oddly, I have never owned a prime lens! I really have to try one one day.

  • Rick says:

    And for Canon users, the 17-40mm f/4 L has been really popular just because of the price to performance factor. One can be had for <$800US.

  • roteague says:

    Love wide angle lenses. My favorite is my Schneider 80mm.

  • fotoeins says:

    Dan, thanks for your article.

    I’ve been using my new Canon 50/1.4 for the last few months on my crop-frame camera, and recently, I borrowed my friend’s Canon 28/2.8. After viewing the world through 50mm (re. 80mm), I was “suddenly reintroduced” to wider fields of view once again. Your article is very timely as I’ve already begun considering the 24/2.8.

  • Paul says:

    The Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X Pro is indeed a great lens. I love mine! To be honest, i struggle to take it off the camera- it sees mor ethan my eye sees! I have a large selection of images taken with this lens on my blog http://www.outdoorphotography.co.nz/

    Thanks for some killer articles by the way. I’m just getting into flash photography- and your ebook is GREAT.

  • Dan Bailey says:

    Thanks for the comment, Paul, and for your feedback on my flash eBook. Cool images on your site! When you get some cool flash images, consider posting some in the Fast With Light Flickr group. http://www.flickr.com/groups/fastwithlight/

  • […] $250. Think “affordable” but not “cheap.” Another post of this type is my Best Budget Wide Angle Lenses […]

  • […] The Best Budget Wide Angle Lenses – Dan Bailey Photo […]

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    Terry Bourk

    I have read you new book “Behind the Landscape.” I could not “put it down” meaning that I kept at it because each photo you presented/analyzed was interesting and informative. I am trying to develop an eye for composition (both the scene and the light).

    Thank you! The examples you present and the suggestions are very helpful. Purple Mountains, McKinley River and Wonder Lake are fascinating.


    Roger Sinclair

    You have done it again! Another triumph.

    Your generosity to share, the clarity of thought and concise explanation thereof is brilliant. Perhaps I should also mention the beautiful photos and the talent necessary to produce them.

    Thank you, Dan.