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  • […] People love shooting the Fuji X cameras, largely because the images have a certain “look” to them. This is due to the Film Simulations that the Fuji engineers carefully modeled into the image processing software. These are taken from some of Fuji’s most celebrated film stocks from the past 80 years and they include films like Provia, Veliva, and Astia, as well as a handful of color negative and black and white choices.  […]

  • […] | danbaileyphotoPeople love shooting the Fuji X cameras, largely because the images have a certain “look” to them. This is due to the Film Simulations that the Fuji engineers carefully modeled into the image processing software. These are taken from some of Fuji’s most celebrated film stocks from the past 80 years and they include films like Provia, Veliva, and Astia, as well as a handful of color negative and black and white choices. Whenever you’re shooting in JPEG mode, you select one of these film sims. The color palette of that particular film are embedded in your final image. Essentially, it’s like using film again. You choose a desired look based on your style lighting conditions and subject matter and go for it, and since the Fuji JPEGS are so good, it saves time from having to shoot everything in RAW and then process later. Having shot many of these original films, I can attest, they look great. Under most conditions, the JPEGS are more than adequate and perfectly fine for general use, and even a variety of professional applications. However, what about when the light is tricky or when you simply want more control? Up until now, if you shot RAW, you’d lose the look of the Fuji film sims, and believe me, it’s next to impossible to perfectly recreate them yourself…….  […]

  • Mike Croshaw says:

    Thanks for this Dan, I’d not taken a look at this before now and its a really nice upgrade to lightroom. Astia is my favourite and they look like they nailed it.

  • Dan Bailey says:

    Mike, I love Astia too. That and Sensia, which was the amateur (cheaper) version, were my favorite 100 speed Fuji films back in the day. It’s great for portraits, and I especially like using the Astia film sim on the X cameras for shooting snow scenes, it seems to handle the contrast really well.

  • Larry Selman says:

    Hi,
    Enjoyed you article. Great reference.
    Can you tell my why when using the one of the B&W film conversions in Lightroom for Fujifilm camera the B&W color way adjustment button blacks out and is not possible to use. I would like to adjust the film conversion there. What am I missing

    Larry

  • Dan Bailey says:

    Larry, it does appear that once you apply the Fuji BW film simulation color profile in LR, you cannot use Lightroom’s BW conversion/adjustment panel. Not sure why this is, but it obviously only lets you apply a BW profile once to the file. It looks like you can still use the adjustment sliders in the calibration panel, and also in the main exposure panel. Or, you could apply the Fuji Monochrome profile, save the image as a 16-bit TIFF, then reimport and use Lightroom’s BW conversion tools. That’s my best answer, hope it helps. -Dan

  • Konstantin says:

    Do I need to upgrade my LR (I’m using Lightroom 3.6) in order to use this feature?

  • Dan Bailey says:

    Yes, the Fuji film simulation color profiles were first introduced in LR version 5.4. Also, upgrading to the latest version will give you slightly better RAW demosaicing quality and sharpness when converting the Fuji RAW files.

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    Terry Bourk

    I have read you new book “Behind the Landscape.” I could not “put it down” meaning that I kept at it because each photo you presented/analyzed was interesting and informative. I am trying to develop an eye for composition (both the scene and the light).

    Thank you! The examples you present and the suggestions are very helpful. Purple Mountains, McKinley River and Wonder Lake are fascinating.


    Roger Sinclair

    You have done it again! Another triumph.

    Your generosity to share, the clarity of thought and concise explanation thereof is brilliant. Perhaps I should also mention the beautiful photos and the talent necessary to produce them.

    Thank you, Dan.