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  • I was more upset the time when the AF-motor on my 50mm prime died than the time when my kit-lens gave up the ghost. I can’t wait to see how my photos “change” when I put the prime on a full-frame camera. Thanks for your post, Dan!

  • Vern Rogers says:

    Ah yes, what memories you stir in this old guy! I well remember when my 50mm f/1.4 lens was the only one I had for my first SLR, a Honeywell Pentax H-3. Most of us had 40mm lenses because they came with the camera back then, and we shot everything with them. Versatile, yes! And, as you say, they still are. I prefer the Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 over the f/1.8 version, and have that one. But the f/1.8 version is a super bargain, for sure. Thanks for the memories. I need to use mine more!

  • Jake says:

    The Canon 50mmf1.8 is garbage. Built poorly, focuses slowly, and not all that sharp unless closed way down. Get Canon’s 1.4. Totally agree that Nikon’s different 50mmf1.8 lenses are wonderful.

  • […] me, it’s my 50mm lens. I know I keep talking about how much I’ve grown to love my nifty fifty over the years, but the truth is that it’s still my least used lens, so every time I pull it […]

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    Terry Bourk

    I have read you new book “Behind the Landscape.” I could not “put it down” meaning that I kept at it because each photo you presented/analyzed was interesting and informative. I am trying to develop an eye for composition (both the scene and the light).

    Thank you! The examples you present and the suggestions are very helpful. Purple Mountains, McKinley River and Wonder Lake are fascinating.


    Roger Sinclair

    You have done it again! Another triumph.

    Your generosity to share, the clarity of thought and concise explanation thereof is brilliant. Perhaps I should also mention the beautiful photos and the talent necessary to produce them.

    Thank you, Dan.