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  • […] Check out my full X-T1 review and field test. It’s a very detailed post with tons of real world information and more full size image samples. Also, I posted a few examples to show you how much information is preserved in X-T1 sensor when you shoot in RAW. […]

  • […] During the past few weeks, I’ve shot quit a few RAW photos with my new Fuji X-T1. However, since Lightroom is not yet able to read the RAW files, I’ve just been sticking them all in a separate folder for safekeeping until I can make use of them.As good as the straight JPEGs from this camera are, I’m eager to see what the RAW files look like. A few months ago, I did a test of how much more color information, latitude and sharpness could be wrangled out of the little X20 when shooting RAW, and I was pretty impressed. Seeing how that camera only has a 2/3″ sensor, I’m hoping to be even more impressed by what the APS-C size 16MP X-Trans II sensor in the X-T1 can do.  […]

  • […] “Dan Bailey's Adventure Photography Blog – Exploring the World of Outdoor Photography with Tips, News, Imagery and Insight (Shooting RAW vs JPEG with the Fuji X-T1 http://t.co/NiBhNaHEEa A look at…”  […]

  • […] During the past few weeks, I’ve shot quit a few RAW photos with my new Fuji X-T1. However, since Lightroom is not yet able to read the RAW files, I’ve just been sticking them all in a separate folder for safekeeping until I can make use of them.As good as the straight JPEGs from this camera are, I’m eager to see what the RAW files look like. A few months ago, I did a test of how much more color information, latitude and sharpness could be wrangled out of the little X20 when shooting RAW, and I was pretty impressed. Seeing how that camera only has a 2/3″ sensor, I’m hoping to be even more impressed by what the APS-C size 16MP X-Trans II sensor in the X-T1 can do.  […]

  • Chen says:

    Dan,
    I live in an area with lots of harsh sunlight, and Fuji’s film simulations and default settings are too contrasty to preserve shadow detail, even in post processing. I also found their default sharpening and noise reduction is smoothing out too much fine details, especially for skin and hair.
    As in your findings, i found the raw to be much better to gather more details and dynamic range.

    I did, however, found the best jpeg settings (for me) for post processing are as follows:
    Pro Negative Standard
    color +2 (boosting the flat look of Pro.st)
    noise reduction -2
    sharpness – 2

    The resulting jpegs are soft, but allow for much greater degree of tone reproduction and detail sharpening without the over processed look.

    Thanx for sharing your experiences so far.

    Chen

  • Chen says:

    Just a clarification on the jpeg settings in the post above:
    simulation: Pro Negative Standard
    colour: +2 (boosting the flat look of Pro.st)
    noise reduction: -2
    sharpness: –2

    Chen

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    Terry Bourk

    I have read you new book “Behind the Landscape.” I could not “put it down” meaning that I kept at it because each photo you presented/analyzed was interesting and informative. I am trying to develop an eye for composition (both the scene and the light).

    Thank you! The examples you present and the suggestions are very helpful. Purple Mountains, McKinley River and Wonder Lake are fascinating.


    Roger Sinclair

    You have done it again! Another triumph.

    Your generosity to share, the clarity of thought and concise explanation thereof is brilliant. Perhaps I should also mention the beautiful photos and the talent necessary to produce them.

    Thank you, Dan.